Why Personal Brand is Essential To Corporate Marketing Success

Plenty has been written about the pros and cons of employees engaging in social media at work, officially or unofficially. Plenty of people have gained and lost jobs through the judicious or indiscrete usage of social media and new media, but by and large, most corporations haven’t truly accepted full employee participation in new media. Here’s a slightly different perspective on personal brand, personal blogs, and corporate success:

Personal brand is absolutely essential to future corporate success, at least from a marketing perspective.

Here’s why. If you have employees who are already engaged in new media – blogging, podcasting, social channels – then they likely already have and belong to other communities. Some of their interests overlap with their coworkers, but not many.

If we drew a Venn diagram (you remember these from school, yes? Logic class?) of the various personal networks and interests of your employees, you’d get something that looks like this:

Venn

That tiny little wedge in the middle is the intersection of personal and corporate networks. Companies that force their employees to rigorously keep personal and professional separate or even require employees not to participate in personal media creation outside of work create and get access to only that tiny little wedge in the middle, and nothing else.

Now imagine that a company, instead of discouraging or trivializing employees’ personal brands, encouraged them to actively grow their own networks, to use and leverage social media and new media to the best of their abilities. Imagine a company so forward-thinking that each employee had their own powerful personal brand and the freedom to express it (as long as said employees weren’t doing anything materially harmful in public).

What would that company’s reach be? Well, instead of the tiny intersection in the middle of those three networks in the chart above, the company’s effective reach would be the sum, the union of all the networks. Each employee’s personal network would contribute to the effective reach of the whole network.

More important, those employees have different audiences than your core corporate audience. For example, look at a few of the employee non-work blogs of the folks over at Radian6:

- Marcel LeBrun
- Amber Naslund
- Lauren Vargas
- Teresa Basich
- Robin Seidner
- Robbie MacCormack

Each of these folks has their own audience. Some of their audience probably doesn’t even know what they do for work. By liberally encouraging their staff to be out and about in new media, Radian6′s reach is much greater than its corporate blog, and its reach extends into different audiences.

What would it take to make this happen? A few things.

On the corporate side:

1. Employee education. Not just about what is or is not professional even in a personal blog (hey, you know that party photo you have in your photo feed…), but also how to build and grow audience, how to communicate effectively, how to create interest in what they’re doing on a personal level.

2. An awesome company with amazing products and services that’s worth talking about. Requiring employees to blog about your company usually falls flat. You shouldn’t have to ask if your employees legitimately love working for you – they’ll do it on their own. You can generally suggest (hey, we’ve got a kickass promotion for new customers, please tell your friends) but you can’t force it on your employees in their personal, non-work spaces.

3. An embrace of the 80/20 rule. Google and 3M are most famous for embedding this rule in their cultures, wherein employees have up to 20% of their schedule freed to experiment, to try new things, to work on stuff that isn’t in the core business objectives list. This includes stuff like personal blogs, networking outside of corporate target audiences, and participation in things that at first glance don’t seem to feed direct ROI numbers. As long as your team is meeting or exceeding their objectives otherwise, let the 80/20 rule operate to bring in the benefits of serendipity.

On the employee side:

1. Employees need to exercise profoundly good judgement at all times, even outside of work. Each of us is in sales. Each of us is in marketing. Each of us is in customer service. Each of us is in public relations. This is true no matter what title is on your business card. Wherever we go, wherever we interact with other people (online or offline) we are ambassadors of the company we work for. Does that mean we’re working 24/7? No. It does mean we’re not a public embarrassment, however. If you’re going to participate in new media in any way, shape, or form, recognize that you are also implicitly representing your employer whether you want to be or not.

2. Employees need to look for opportunities to build business. If an employer implements the 80/20 rule, there’s an informal social contract that effectively says, if you’re allowed to do your own thing and build your own brand using some work time, throw us a bone here and there so that we’re getting an equal exchange of value. Put up a navigation bar link on your blog with our top SEO keyword (hey, look at that shiny email marketing link), mention us if it’s appropriate when the topic of our business comes up in conversation, and refer people to sales if you’ve got a friend who really and truly needs what we have to offer.

3. Don’t feel obligated to participate. At companies where you have highly engaged coworkers, you may be asked or even subtly peer-pressured into doing the same things. Don’t. If your heart isn’t in blogging or Tweeting or creating new media, don’t do it, because the outcome will suck. The outcome will reflect your lack of passion, and your time is better spent doing things you love.

If you can match up the power of personal networks and different audiences with a great company, great products, and talk-worthy stuff, your reach and influence will be magnified far beyond what you have today.


Did you enjoy this blog post? If so, please subscribe right now!

Get this and other great articles from the source at www.ChristopherSPenn.com! Want to take your conference or event to the next level? Book me to speak and get the same quality information on stage as you do on this blog.

  • http://www.davidsfinch.com David Finch

    Chris, I think it can be a win-win situation for both the employee and the employer. However, good judgment is a must for the employee. For example, I work for a traditional ad agency. It's my “personal brand” that made this opportunity available, but when I go to events sponsored or paid for by my employer I'm there to represent them.

    That said, we have an agreement that if I go on “my dime” then I'm there to represent myself and my own projects without any pressure to be their guy (even though I wouldn't do anything to embarrass the agency).

    Because of abuse, some employers struggle with an employee's personal brand, but as you mentioned in your post there can be a benefits for both. At the end of day, it boils down to trust.

  • http://www.davidsfinch.com David Finch

    Chris, I think it can be a win-win situation for both the employee and the employer. However, good judgment is a must for the employee. For example, I work for a traditional ad agency. It's my “personal brand” that made this opportunity available, but when I go to events sponsored or paid for by my employer I'm there to represent them.

    That said, we have an agreement that if I go on “my dime” then I'm there to represent myself and my own projects without any pressure to be their guy (even though I wouldn't do anything to embarrass the agency).

    Because of abuse, some employers struggle with an employee's personal brand, but as you mentioned in your post there can be a benefits for both. At the end of day, it boils down to trust.

  • http://socialbutterflyguy.com/ DJ Waldow

    Chris –

    As you can imagine, I'm 100% in agreement with nearly every word in this post.

    Point #3 on the employee side – Don’t feel obligated to participate – is one that I think many companies miss. I've heard comments like, “everyone needs to blog” or “you must have a twitter account.” No. No. No. As you say, if you are not into it, not passionate about online/social media participation, it can have a negative effect (both for the individual and the company).

    Thanks for taking the time to write about this. Great topic.

    DJ Waldow
    Director of Community, Blue Sky Factory
    @djwaldow

  • http://socialbutterflyguy.com/ DJ Waldow

    Chris –

    As you can imagine, I'm 100% in agreement with nearly every word in this post.

    Point #3 on the employee side – Don’t feel obligated to participate – is one that I think many companies miss. I've heard comments like, “everyone needs to blog” or “you must have a twitter account.” No. No. No. As you say, if you are not into it, not passionate about online/social media participation, it can have a negative effect (both for the individual and the company).

    Thanks for taking the time to write about this. Great topic.

    DJ Waldow
    Director of Community, Blue Sky Factory
    @djwaldow

  • http://twitter.com/vargasl Lauren Vargas

    Chris,

    Normally, I avoid personal brand posts like the plague because many seem to be advocating such selfish strategies. However, in this post you clearly describe the symbiotic new media relationship between company and employee. I dig this twist and thank you for using Radian6 as an example. In my former job, I worked for an organization that frowned upon employees participating in social media. While posting to my own blog, despite their warnings, I never placed my organization in negative light…but I never felt any driving need or desire to place them in a positive light, either. At Radian6, I have never been told not to post something or regulate my social media participation…in fact, I am more cognizant of my online behavior because I do not want to be an embarrassment and I am more willing to praise my company outside the official channels.

    Lauren Vargas
    Community Manager at Radian6
    @VargasL

  • http://twitter.com/vargasl Lauren Vargas

    Chris,

    Normally, I avoid personal brand posts like the plague because many seem to be advocating such selfish strategies. However, in this post you clearly describe the symbiotic new media relationship between company and employee. I dig this twist and thank you for using Radian6 as an example. In my former job, I worked for an organization that frowned upon employees participating in social media. While posting to my own blog, despite their warnings, I never placed my organization in negative light…but I never felt any driving need or desire to place them in a positive light, either. At Radian6, I have never been told not to post something or regulate my social media participation…in fact, I am more cognizant of my online behavior because I do not want to be an embarrassment and I am more willing to praise my company outside the official channels.

    Lauren Vargas
    Community Manager at Radian6
    @VargasL

  • AmberNaslund

    This post is so, so well done. You've done a really remarkable job of cutting through the clutter and hype about “personal brand” and explained how it overlaps with business so well. I can't wait to send more people to this post.

    I'm very fortunate to work in a culture that naturally “gets” this approach. And folks ask me all the time how you foster a culture like that, but here's the trick. The people that lead my company – the individuals – get it themselves. Personally. Collectively, that forms a culture.

    I'm still chewing on whether or not those values can be taught if they're not innate. In other words, if you're a hard and fast paranoid corporate Joe that believes your employees are more of a liability than an asset, can I convince you otherwise? If so, with what information and proof? If not, are those companies simply doomed to fall behind?

    I'm still thinking on that, but I love how clearly you've laid this out here. Thank you.

  • AmberNaslund

    This post is so, so well done. You've done a really remarkable job of cutting through the clutter and hype about “personal brand” and explained how it overlaps with business so well. I can't wait to send more people to this post.

    I'm very fortunate to work in a culture that naturally “gets” this approach. And folks ask me all the time how you foster a culture like that, but here's the trick. The people that lead my company – the individuals – get it themselves. Personally. Collectively, that forms a culture.

    I'm still chewing on whether or not those values can be taught if they're not innate. In other words, if you're a hard and fast paranoid corporate Joe that believes your employees are more of a liability than an asset, can I convince you otherwise? If so, with what information and proof? If not, are those companies simply doomed to fall behind?

    I'm still thinking on that, but I love how clearly you've laid this out here. Thank you.

  • http://ariwriter.com Ari Herzog

    “By liberally encouraging their staff to be out and about in new media, Radian6’s reach is much greater than its corporate blog, and its reach extends into different audiences.”

    Would those employees cease blogging on their non-work sites if their employer told them so? Or, would they quit — and would the employer care?

  • http://personalbranding101.com/ Ryan Rancatore

    Chris – A truly incredible article that squashes so many negative personal branding myths all in one. Kudos to you! The organizations that blindly place a clamp on such outside activities will fail to attract and retain the brightest, most motivated employees.

    Shockingly, companies are made of employees, and employees are….people! Your work is proof in the pudding. I heard about you first, your company second. What other companies would benefit from similar exposure? (Hint: almost all of them)

    Nice work!

  • http://personalbranding101.com/ Ryan Rancatore

    Chris – A truly incredible article that squashes so many negative personal branding myths all in one. Kudos to you! The organizations that blindly place a clamp on such outside activities will fail to attract and retain the brightest, most motivated employees.

    Shockingly, companies are made of employees, and employees are….people! Your work is proof in the pudding. I heard about you first, your company second. What other companies would benefit from similar exposure? (Hint: almost all of them)

    Nice work!

  • http://www.davidsfinch.com David Finch

    Chris, I think it can be a win-win situation for both the employee and the employer. However, good judgment is a must for the employee. For example, I work for a traditional ad agency. It's my “personal brand” that made this opportunity available, but when I go to events sponsored or paid for by my employer I'm there to represent them.

    That said, we have an agreement that if I go on “my dime” then I'm there to represent myself and my own projects without any pressure to be their guy (even though I wouldn't do anything to embarrass the agency).

    Because of abuse, some employers struggle with an employee's personal brand, but as you mentioned in your post there can be a benefits for both. At the end of day, it boils down to trust.

  • http://socialbutterflyguy.com/ DJ Waldow

    Chris –

    As you can imagine, I'm 100% in agreement with nearly every word in this post.

    Point #3 on the employee side – Don’t feel obligated to participate – is one that I think many companies miss. I've heard comments like, “everyone needs to blog” or “you must have a twitter account.” No. No. No. As you say, if you are not into it, not passionate about online/social media participation, it can have a negative effect (both for the individual and the company).

    Thanks for taking the time to write about this. Great topic.

    DJ Waldow
    Director of Community, Blue Sky Factory
    @djwaldow

  • http://twitter.com/vargasl Lauren Vargas

    Chris,

    Normally, I avoid personal brand posts like the plague because many seem to be advocating such selfish strategies. However, in this post you clearly describe the symbiotic new media relationship between company and employee. I dig this twist and thank you for using Radian6 as an example. In my former job, I worked for an organization that frowned upon employees participating in social media. While posting to my own blog, despite their warnings, I never placed my organization in negative light…but I never felt any driving need or desire to place them in a positive light, either. At Radian6, I have never been told not to post something or regulate my social media participation…in fact, I am more cognizant of my online behavior because I do not want to be an embarrassment and I am more willing to praise my company outside the official channels.

    Lauren Vargas
    Community Manager at Radian6
    @VargasL

  • AmberNaslund

    This post is so, so well done. You've done a really remarkable job of cutting through the clutter and hype about “personal brand” and explained how it overlaps with business so well. I can't wait to send more people to this post.

    I'm very fortunate to work in a culture that naturally “gets” this approach. And folks ask me all the time how you foster a culture like that, but here's the trick. The people that lead my company – the individuals – get it themselves. Personally. Collectively, that forms a culture.

    I'm still chewing on whether or not those values can be taught if they're not innate. In other words, if you're a hard and fast paranoid corporate Joe that believes your employees are more of a liability than an asset, can I convince you otherwise? If so, with what information and proof? If not, are those companies simply doomed to fall behind?

    I'm still thinking on that, but I love how clearly you've laid this out here. Thank you.

  • http://wordswillsaveme.wordpress.com Teresa Basich

    Here I am, late to the party! :)

    This is a really fantastic post, Chris. I, like my colleagues who've already commented, am not a huge believer in the concept of personal brand. I do, however, greatly appreciate the connection you've made between a person's presence in the online social space and it's potential positive impact on the reputation and clout of his or her employer.

    The hard and fast reality is that many people are speaking out and maintaining some sort of presence here whether their employer likes it or not. To get in the way of that desire to be social, to connect with others out here, is to be like an overly strict parent: all that blocking behavior does is make people resent you as an authority figure, parent or employer. And what do people do when someone tells them to act one way or NOT do something? They act another way and go do what they've been asked not to do.

    Show you trust your employees' judgment, let them do what they're going to do, and they'll almost inevitably behave in the ways you want them to, and more often than not behave better because they'll appreciate your trust and RESPECT you for it.

    Psychology, people! Psychology! There's more to say on this, of course, but I'm a little punchy. Thank you for the wonderful post and the incredible compliment to our team. :)

    Cheers,
    Teresa

    Teresa Basich
    Content Marketing Manager, Radian6
    @TransitionalTee

  • http://wordswillsaveme.wordpress.com Teresa Basich

    Here I am, late to the party! :)

    This is a really fantastic post, Chris. I, like my colleagues who've already commented, am not a huge believer in the concept of personal brand. I do, however, greatly appreciate the connection you've made between a person's presence in the online social space and it's potential positive impact on the reputation and clout of his or her employer.

    The hard and fast reality is that many people are speaking out and maintaining some sort of presence here whether their employer likes it or not. To get in the way of that desire to be social, to connect with others out here, is to be like an overly strict parent: all that blocking behavior does is make people resent you as an authority figure, parent or employer. And what do people do when someone tells them to act one way or NOT do something? They act another way and go do what they've been asked not to do.

    Show you trust your employees' judgment, let them do what they're going to do, and they'll almost inevitably behave in the ways you want them to, and more often than not behave better because they'll appreciate your trust and RESPECT you for it.

    Psychology, people! Psychology! There's more to say on this, of course, but I'm a little punchy. Thank you for the wonderful post and the incredible compliment to our team. :)

    Cheers,
    Teresa

    Teresa Basich
    Content Marketing Manager, Radian6
    @TransitionalTee

  • http://ariwriter.com Ari Herzog

    “By liberally encouraging their staff to be out and about in new media, Radian6’s reach is much greater than its corporate blog, and its reach extends into different audiences.”

    Would those employees cease blogging on their non-work sites if their employer told them so? Or, would they quit — and would the employer care?

  • http://personalbranding101.com/ Ryan Rancatore

    Chris – A truly incredible article that squashes so many negative personal branding myths all in one. Kudos to you! The organizations that blindly place a clamp on such outside activities will fail to attract and retain the brightest, most motivated employees.

    Shockingly, companies are made of employees, and employees are….people! Your work is proof in the pudding. I heard about you first, your company second. What other companies would benefit from similar exposure? (Hint: almost all of them)

    Nice work!

  • http://wordswillsaveme.wordpress.com Teresa Basich

    Here I am, late to the party! :)

    This is a really fantastic post, Chris. I, like my colleagues who've already commented, am not a huge believer in the concept of personal brand. I do, however, greatly appreciate the connection you've made between a person's presence in the online social space and it's potential positive impact on the reputation and clout of his or her employer.

    The hard and fast reality is that many people are speaking out and maintaining some sort of presence here whether their employer likes it or not. To get in the way of that desire to be social, to connect with others out here, is to be like an overly strict parent: all that blocking behavior does is make people resent you as an authority figure, parent or employer. And what do people do when someone tells them to act one way or NOT do something? They act another way and go do what they've been asked not to do.

    Show you trust your employees' judgment, let them do what they're going to do, and they'll almost inevitably behave in the ways you want them to, and more often than not behave better because they'll appreciate your trust and RESPECT you for it.

    Psychology, people! Psychology! There's more to say on this, of course, but I'm a little punchy. Thank you for the wonderful post and the incredible compliment to our team. :)

    Cheers,
    Teresa

    Teresa Basich
    Content Marketing Manager, Radian6
    @TransitionalTee

  • http://www.parkcitymountain.com/ kristaparry

    Thank you for your timely post Chris. I am on a conference panel this week and this exact topic is one of the questions they've asked me to prepare for. I will send everyone to your post.

    I work in the ski business where the majority of the people who work here are very passionate about what they do. Why not allow them to share that passion, vs control how and what they say? I am fortunate to work for a company similar to Radian6 who encourage us to actively participate in this space.

  • http://www.parkcitymountain.com/ kristaparry

    Thank you for your timely post Chris. I am on a conference panel this week and this exact topic is one of the questions they've asked me to prepare for. I will send everyone to your post.

    I work in the ski business where the majority of the people who work here are very passionate about what they do. Why not allow them to share that passion, vs control how and what they say? I am fortunate to work for a company similar to Radian6 who encourage us to actively participate in this space.

  • http://www.parkcitymountain.com/ kristaparry

    Thank you for your timely post Chris. I am on a conference panel this week and this exact topic is one of the questions they've asked me to prepare for. I will send everyone to your post.

    I work in the ski business where the majority of the people who work here are very passionate about what they do. Why not allow them to share that passion, vs control how and what they say? I am fortunate to work for a company similar to Radian6 who encourage us to actively participate in this space.

  • http://candidkatie.com Katie Morse

    Well shoot, I'll join in as well!

    Much like Lauren, I've worked at companies that didn't support employee participation on the social web. I, for a large part of my career so far, have kept my “social media life” pretty separate from my “working life”. The two really didn't mix until recently and I've seen how both companies and employees can win (and lose, sometimes) from employees being “out there” on the social web.

    I'm sure my opinions are probably a bit different than most, seeing as much of my social and business life has been shaped by my use of the Internet. To name one great example, my entire social circle in England was found through a message board.

    I've been “out there” online for a long time, and I've always been very careful to represent myself both honestly and professionally (in one sense of the word). My general mantra is to not put anything out for public consumption that I wouldn't mind being broadcast on the evening news, and it has served me well through the years.

    Great post, Chris!

    Katie
    Community Manager | Radian6
    @misskatiemo

  • http://candidkatie.com Katie Morse

    Well shoot, I'll join in as well!

    Much like Lauren, I've worked at companies that didn't support employee participation on the social web. I, for a large part of my career so far, have kept my “social media life” pretty separate from my “working life”. The two really didn't mix until recently and I've seen how both companies and employees can win (and lose, sometimes) from employees being “out there” on the social web.

    I'm sure my opinions are probably a bit different than most, seeing as much of my social and business life has been shaped by my use of the Internet. To name one great example, my entire social circle in England was found through a message board.

    I've been “out there” online for a long time, and I've always been very careful to represent myself both honestly and professionally (in one sense of the word). My general mantra is to not put anything out for public consumption that I wouldn't mind being broadcast on the evening news, and it has served me well through the years.

    Great post, Chris!

    Katie
    Community Manager | Radian6
    @misskatiemo

  • http://candidkatie.com Katie Morse

    Well shoot, I'll join in as well!

    Much like Lauren, I've worked at companies that didn't support employee participation on the social web. I, for a large part of my career so far, have kept my “social media life” pretty separate from my “working life”. The two really didn't mix until recently and I've seen how both companies and employees can win (and lose, sometimes) from employees being “out there” on the social web.

    I'm sure my opinions are probably a bit different than most, seeing as much of my social and business life has been shaped by my use of the Internet. To name one great example, my entire social circle in England was found through a message board.

    I've been “out there” online for a long time, and I've always been very careful to represent myself both honestly and professionally (in one sense of the word). My general mantra is to not put anything out for public consumption that I wouldn't mind being broadcast on the evening news, and it has served me well through the years.

    Great post, Chris!

    Katie
    Community Manager | Radian6
    @misskatiemo

  • rickahardy

    Chris, thanks for your post. For those of us in the choir, it's a no-brainer. I wrote on this topic on my blog in relation to higher education marketing: http://wp.me/pusPd-qe

    On the one hand, for-profits could learn from higher education that has had community managers for decades, and depends on interaction between employee and consumer. Higher Ed leadership gets that. But it isn't hasn't incorporated social media responsibilities into those community manager positions, or expanded such a program to all employees. I think a major reason for the hesitancy is that leadership is not involved in social media and has shallow definitions of what social media is.

    You've articulated the benefits and responsibilities very well. Hopefully organizations of all sorts will begin to get it.

  • rickahardy

    Chris, thanks for your post. For those of us in the choir, it's a no-brainer. I wrote on this topic on my blog in relation to higher education marketing: http://wp.me/pusPd-qe

    On the one hand, for-profits could learn from higher education that has had community managers for decades, and depends on interaction between employee and consumer. Higher Ed leadership gets that. But it isn't hasn't incorporated social media responsibilities into those community manager positions, or expanded such a program to all employees. I think a major reason for the hesitancy is that leadership is not involved in social media and has shallow definitions of what social media is.

    You've articulated the benefits and responsibilities very well. Hopefully organizations of all sorts will begin to get it.

  • http://paulgailey.com/ Paul Gailey

    Once the Napster generation age to become today´s management, will this conjecture just fade away as the vast majority will be connected and participant on the web and their management never needed to be evangelised to. Recruitment practice will seek out the better connected potential employees because companies will regard it as a big positive rather than an inconvenience that currently get the firewall treatment or the red card. Or will conservatism prevail?

  • http://paulgailey.com/ Paul Gailey

    Once the Napster generation age to become today´s management, will this conjecture just fade away as the vast majority will be connected and participant on the web and their management never needed to be evangelised to. Recruitment practice will seek out the better connected potential employees because companies will regard it as a big positive rather than an inconvenience that currently get the firewall treatment or the red card. Or will conservatism prevail?

  • rickahardy

    Chris, thanks for your post. For those of us in the choir, it's a no-brainer. I wrote on this topic on my blog in relation to higher education marketing: http://wp.me/pusPd-qe

    On the one hand, for-profits could learn from higher education that has had community managers for decades, and depends on interaction between employee and consumer. Higher Ed leadership gets that. But it isn't hasn't incorporated social media responsibilities into those community manager positions, or expanded such a program to all employees. I think a major reason for the hesitancy is that leadership is not involved in social media and has shallow definitions of what social media is.

    You've articulated the benefits and responsibilities very well. Hopefully organizations of all sorts will begin to get it.

  • rickahardy

    Chris, thanks for your post. For those of us in the choir, it's a no-brainer. I wrote on this topic on my blog in relation to higher education marketing: http://wp.me/pusPd-qe

    On the one hand, for-profits could learn from higher education that has had community managers for decades, and depends on interaction between employee and consumer. Higher Ed leadership gets that. But it isn't hasn't incorporated social media responsibilities into those community manager positions, or expanded such a program to all employees. I think a major reason for the hesitancy is that leadership is not involved in social media and has shallow definitions of what social media is.

    You've articulated the benefits and responsibilities very well. Hopefully organizations of all sorts will begin to get it.

  • http://paulgailey.com/ Paul Gailey

    Once the Napster generation age to become today´s management, will this conjecture just fade away as the vast majority will be connected and participant on the web and their management never needed to be evangelised to. Recruitment practice will seek out the better connected potential employees because companies will regard it as a big positive rather than an inconvenience that currently get the firewall treatment or the red card. Or will conservatism prevail?

  • http://paulgailey.com/ Paul Gailey

    Once the Napster generation age to become today´s management, will this conjecture just fade away as the vast majority will be connected and participant on the web and their management never needed to be evangelised to. Recruitment practice will seek out the better connected potential employees because companies will regard it as a big positive rather than an inconvenience that currently get the firewall treatment or the red card. Or will conservatism prevail?

  • http://personalnetwork.wordpress.com Phil O’Brien

    I’m really enjoying your blog and newsletter – thank you. Just been digging through your archive and found this post. Very interesting (especially like the visualisation) – have written up part of it on my blog today – http://personalnetwork.wordpress.com/. Hope that’s OK? Phil

  • http://twitter.com/vfung Vincent Fung

    Nice insight… love how you break it down into simple terms! Will need to share this post at work.