Are you on the MAP? (Marketing Affiliate Program)

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I’m grateful that many of you have enjoyed my books and publications over the years, from Marketing White Belt to the most recent Marketing Blue Belt. Today, I want to unveil a new way for you to be a greater part of these books: join the Marketing Affiliate Program!

What’s in it for you?

By becoming a marketing affiliate, you’ll earn a commission on each book or webinar you sell to your audience. The more you sell, the more you earn.

How much will you earn?

Here’s the good part. If you’ve already been reselling my books using an Amazon affiliate link, you know that Amazon pays a paltry 4% to affiliates. For every $9.99 book you sell, at Amazon you only earn 40 cents, and you can’t even buy webinars on Amazon.

In my Marketing Affiliate Program, you’ll earn a 25% commission on anything sold.

So for my books, you’ll earn $2.50 per book. For webinars, you’ll earn $7.50 per webinar.

How do you get started?

This is an easy two-step process. First, you must register for a free account on Gumroad.com. This is mandatory – I can’t set you up as an affiliate until you’re in their system.

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Once you’re done, and only after you’re done setting up your free account, just fill out this form. I’ll get you customized URLs for the products you want to resell, normally within 3-5 business days.

Join the Marketing Affiliate Program (MAP)

Register to become an affiliate for my marketing books and webinars. YOU MUST ALREADY HAVE A FREE ACCOUNT ON GUMROAD.COM BEFORE STARTING! New affiliate registrations will be processed in 3-5 business days or less.
  • You will receive an emailed invitation from me with customized links for the products you want to sell.
    Choose any of the above.
  • Yeah, it's a CAPTCHA. Any time you dip your toe into affiliate marketing, the spammers come out in droves.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

If you’re reading this in an RSS reader, chances are no form will appear, so you’ll need to visit this post on my website.

I look forward to having you in the program! Oh, and a reminder that if you do participate, be sure to read FTC guidelines on disclosing that you are an affiliate.


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The missing investment ingredients in marketing ROI

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Do your marketing ROI calculations sync up with the reality of your company’s bottom line? Or have you put together an ROI calculation and found your net revenue projections falling short? Chances are, you’re missing some key ingredients in the calculation of ROI, especially on the I part, investment.

Recall that ROI is a simple math equation: (Earned – Spent) / Spent. Your revenue is offset by your investment.

What do you spend money on that fuels your marketing? For most marketers, we think of only campaign spends, like ad budgets or the price of a marketing agency. However, if you wanted to build a complete, thorough picture of ROI, you’ll need to detail three kinds of money: system, hard, and soft.

Let’s look at these three kinds of money through the lens of a Google AdWords campaign.

Hard Dollars

Hard dollars are actual money paid out. If you run an AdWords campaign, hard dollars would be the money you pay to Google to make the ads appear. This is the most common ingredient in ROI calculations.

Soft Dollars

How long did it take you to write your AdWords ads? How long did it take your creative team to put together some display images? How long did it take you to load the ads into the system and hit go?

Time is the greatest source of soft dollars. You account for it by what your effective hourly rate is, and add that to investment. For example, suppose your salary is $50,000 per year. Your hourly equivalent rate is $24.04 per hour. Thus, every hour you spend on AdWords adds an additional $24.04 to the cost of your campaigns.

System Dollars

You don’t just imagine an AdWords ad and it appears. You created that ad on a computer, using electricity, with an Internet connection, possibly at a desk inside a building that you pay rent on. If you work at a company, all the benefits like insurance, office perks, etc. add up to your total cost as an employee. If you’re self-employed, the money you spend on yourself in a work context adds up to your business expenses.

Those system dollars create the environment needed for you to do your work. What do they cost? The easiest way to calculate system dollars is to simply divide the operating expenses of employees (less salary and cash benefits) by the number of employees at a business level, and then add that to the effective hourly rate.

For example, if your business spends $10,000 a year in system dollars to maintain the desk, computer, etc. and your salary costs the business $50,000 per year, that puts your effective cost at $60,000 per year, or $28.85 per hour. Every hour you spend on AdWords should add $28.85 into the campaign cost.

Add The Dollars Up

While this one example may seem like overkill to compute the ROI of an AdWords campaign, you must apply this methodology to all your marketing ROI calculations. Once you’ve accounted for hard and soft dollars, ensure that you’ve accounted for system dollars and you’ll have much more accurate ROI calculations.


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How to track offsite conversions with Google Analytics

Michael Mindes of Tasty Minstrel Games asked:

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This is a terrific question and not necessarily as complicated as you might think. It requires some logic and inference.

First, begin with understanding what the goal is. On Amazon, the goal is sales. We want to sell as many of our products as possible. If you’re in Amazon Associates, then your goal is selling other peoples’ stuff. If you’re in KDP or Webstores, it’s selling your own products. For example, all of my books are sold both on my website and on Amazon.

Once you know what the overall sales goal is, you have to get your sales data from Amazon. Let’s use Marketing White Belt as an example. In the last 90 days, I’ve sold approximately $60 of Marketing White Belt on Amazon. So far, so good. I know what my traffic to Amazon is worth.

The next question is, how much traffic have I sent to Amazon? Using Google Analytics event tracking, I can track how many times people click on my Marketing White Belt book ads on my website:

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89 clicks. Thus, I can make the starting inference that my value per click is $60/89, or 67 cents per click on my Marketing White Belt ads. Thus, I can set a goal value in my Google Analytics admin that any time I get an outbound click on my Marketing White Belt book, call it 67 cents of revenue.

Obviously, this isn’t exact. People can buy the book from Amazon without ever having been to my site. Thus, it’s important to rebalance. I’d run this analysis every 30 days and recompute the value of a click from my website to Amazon. Over time, I’d get enough data to create a reasonable average, and then use a rolling average to settle in on a value per click.

To Michael’s question, what about Amazon affiliates, where you’re sending clicks to other people’s stuff? Again, the same general logic applies. You know how much money you earn from Amazon each month, from the Associates reports. You should know, using Google Analytics, how many clicks you’re sending to Amazon. Work out what a value per click is, and you’ve got the beginnings of decent estimation.

Get as granular as you can, too. If you’re an Associate focusing on several different verticals, consider setting up event tracking categories. You might have one tracking event for electronics, another for books, etc. and then from your Associates reports, break out the fees you earned in each category. Now you can set up goal conversions per category.

Good luck tracking! Be sure to read up on Google Analytics Event Tracking.


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