3 ways to add more personality to your content

Whether it’s email, social, blogging, video, or other forms of content, personality counts, and it counts for a lot. Personality also means more than just speaking with a voice or writing in the first person; personality in your content and digital marketing is about creating a blend of unique attributes that are clearly and unequivocally you. Here’s the simplest test of this: if I removed your branding and logo from your blog or stripped the formatting out of your email, could I still tell that it’s your content, or is it so generic that it could have been created by anyone?

To avoid this, let’s look at 3 ways you can add your distinct personality to content you create to make it very obviously you, so you that anyone copying it or imitating it will be a pale imitation of you.

1. Use your own photography. Nothing says “we have no personality” like using corporate stock photography all the time. There are certainly times and places where stock photography has its merits, especially if you need a very high quality, high resolution photo. Those situations are getting increasingly rare as the cameras in our smartphones and mobile devices get better and better.

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The more you can incorporate photos of places you actually are, people you actually work with, things you actually experience, the more unique your content will be.

2. Use your own people individually. When an email newsletter or a blog post comes out, nothing kills personality faster than having it signed, “The Team at X Corporation”. “The Team” is corporate code for “we don’t trust anyone to speak for our brand without 20 lawyers” or “An intern made all the content you see because we don’t actually care about you, some speaker at a conference said we needed a blog”. Sign your names. Use your photos.

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Take ownership and responsibility for what you publish, and stand proudly behind it.

3. Create content in a unique way. I have a particular style in which I draw. It’s my personality, my skills (or lack thereof), and it’s unmistakeable. When I create content using that style, it screams out my name.

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I even translate this particular style to video:

Other people have their own styles that are unmistakably theirs, like Matthew Inman from The Oatmeal or Hugh MacLeod. Chances are, if you have more than 10 people at your company, one of them has a signature style that you can ask to use that can be associated with you.

“Being yourself” and “being authentic” is getting harder and harder. Use these three ideas to help set yourself even further apart from the crowd.


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  • Christina Smith

    Love this post, especially ” an intern made all the content you see because we don’t actually care about you. Some speaker at a conference said we needed a blog.” Funny and true.
    I often advise clients they need to be less fearful and more themselves in writing copy and producing content. Many are afraid someone won’t like them if they show a little personality. But if they’re a small business or one that develops a relationship with their clients/customers, the customer will eventually see these “nuances” of their personality anyway. Best to flavor your content with the real-ish you (I don’t advise complete crying in your soup transparency, of course) than shy away from it and create something that reads like a brochure out of a business writing class from the ’90s.
    Great post.