What does Twitter’s missing shares mean for your marketing analytics?

What does Twitter’s missing shares mean for your marketing analytics?

In case you missed in, on November 20, Twitter eliminated the public counts of shares on its buttons and in its infrastructure. You can no longer see how many times a URL was shared on Twitter.

Much has been written about this topic, and I encourage you to check out the perspectives of Mark Schaefer and Jay Baer for potential reasons why, beyond the official reasons given.

Regardless of the reasons, does this impact you? As a marketer, and as a marketing technologist, I would argue the answer is no, not really. Why? Twitter shares are a diagnostic metric for social media. They tell you how many people care enough to hit the retweet button.

Retweets are helpful. They’re part of social media engagement. However, they are not the endgame. The endgame is conversion, action, tangible impact. For most organizations other than those seeking raw numbers of eyeballs, shares are not something you can take to the bank.

Google Analytics should still be your database of record for how impactful any digital channel, including Twitter, is:

2015_2014_twitter_analytics.jpg

What we care about is whether Twitter is bringing in audiences at the top of the funnel, all the way down to…

TwitterAssisted_Conversions_-_Google_Analytics.jpg

Is Twitter delivering any business impact to you?

Should you be concerned about the lack of share counts? For your own tweets, you’ll still get that data in Twitter’s basic analytics, and it will not be long before an entire niche of startups appear offering alternatives to Twitter’s share counts. In the meantime, stay focused on your Google Analytics data and how each channel is sending you traffic. That’s the best way to manage all your social media.


If you enjoyed this, please share it with your network!


Want to read more like this from ? Get updates here:


Marketing Blue Belt Preorder

Order your 2016 Marketing Planning Framework


How I schedule social media content with Buffer [VIDEO]

No fewer than a half dozen people have asked me recently how I’m scheduling my social media content. Here’s a quick video that shows the entire process in just 11 minutes a day or so, depending on how fast you read.


Click here for the full size version on YouTube.

In this video, the following things are mentioned:

Feedly.com for content curation
Flaticon for default art (paid)
Flickr for photo storage and sharing
Buffer, obviously
Buffer’s Pablo app
Tamsen Webster’s Buffer image tip
Moz FollowerWonk for Buffer timing
Buffer Optimal Timing Tool for Buffer timing

I do want to emphasize strongly that this process is my particular way of doing it. It is not “the right way”, nor is it appropriate for a company with an actual social media team that can devote lots of hours and effort to curating content that’s unique and tailored to each channel. This is a methodology more suited for a solo proprietor/individual practitioner who doesn’t have hours a day to devote to content scheduling.


If you enjoyed this, please share it with your network!


Want to read more like this from ? Get updates here:


Marketing Blue Belt Preorder

Order your 2016 Marketing Planning Framework


IBM Watson Analytics Does Twitter Hashtags

Disclosure: IBM sponsored my attendance at their Analytics For All event. This post was written prior to the event.

I’ve written and spoken about IBM’s Watson (yes, the supercomputer that won Jeopardy) Analytics, and how it’s affordable Big Data analytics for marketers (for most small and medium businesses, $30 a month). IBM has upped the ante with its integration of Twitter hashtag analysis, which most social media marketers will find fascinating.

You begin by choosing Twitter as a data source:

Watson_Analytics.png

From there, you can use any of the modules Watson is known for. As I spoke recently at Social Media Success Summit, I decided to use that hashtag to explore potential queries:

Watson_Analytics_2.png

For example, how does sentiment influence retweets?

Watson_Analytics_3.png

Above, we see that Watson’s sentiment detection shows that no, sentiment doesn’t seem to influence retweets.

Is there a pattern in retweets by sentiment over time?

Watson_Analytics_4.png

So what does drive retweets? We jump over to the prediction module to ask:

Watson_Analytics_RT.png

For the #SMSS15 hashtag, geography and follower count are what influence retweets most, albeit weakly.

Watson’s Twitter import has restrictions; for the basic account, you’re limited to 25,000 tweets at a time, so if you wanted to tackle something like the 2016 presidential election, you’d need to upgrade. However, for most marketers, Watson will do fine out of the box. Give it a try with the hashtags you care about!

Disclosure: IBM sponsored my attendance at their Analytics For All event by paying my travel and expenses to the event. This post was written prior to the event. Full disclosures including potential financial conflicts of interest here.


If you enjoyed this, please share it with your network!


Want to read more like this from ? Get updates here:


Marketing Blue Belt Preorder

Order your 2016 Marketing Planning Framework