Blueprints, marketing strategy, and execution

Take a look at this house:

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This is from 1921, when you could order a house (or at least all the materials to build one) from a Sears Roebuck catalog.

Despite being almost 100 years old, this house plan is still practical today. You might make a few materials changes, and some minor specifications might need to be altered to be compliant with modern building codes. For the most part though, you could build and live in this century-old design today.

Why? Fundamentally, the house meets all of the basic requirements of what a house is supposed to do. It accomplishes the big picture goals quite handily. Protection from the elements? Check. Comfort? Sure. It may not be palatial, but it’s better than a tent. Attractive? Maybe not out of the box, but lived in for a while, it could be the centerpiece of a wonderful garden.

Now think about the things that wouldn’t be in this 1921 design. No wi-fi, probably no telephones in general. No air conditioning. May or may not have been wired for electricity; anything in a Sears Roebuck catalog was targeted at suburban and rural areas.

Are any of these conveniences insurmountable? Of course not. They’re minor tweaks and add-ons to the house as a whole and they don’t substantially change the purpose of the house.

What does this have to do with marketing? Marketing folks lately (especially the growth hacker movement) are fond of saying that strategy is worthless. Strategy is unnecessary. Strategy is too static, too inflexible, too difficult for an agile, digital landscape.

What’s fundamentally wrong is confusion of strategy and execution.

The strategy of marketing is to generate leads within a certain timeframe that sales can sell to. The strategy of marketing is to position the company as a leader so that it’s the first and only choice for your customers.

When you view strategy through this lens, you realize it’s just like the house framework above. You can adapt the tactical implementation and execution endlessly. You can choose channels, methods, budgets, etc. to infinity. At the end of the day however, you’ve either generated enough leads for sales or you haven’t. Your company is a category leader or it isn’t.

Don’t be too hasty in your disregard for marketing strategy. It’s difficult to do, but it’s even more difficult to be successful without it.


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How to market your podcast, part 4: Twitter tactics for exposure

Podcasting has found new favor with the marketing world. Marketers are creating podcasts left and right, but are spending so much time on creating it that they forget to market it. This series is for you, so that people listen or watch your new creation.


Posts in the How to Market Your Podcast series:

Interested in a real-life example? Check out my marketing podcast, Marketing Over Coffee!


Today, let’s switch over from the strategic perspective to the tactical, nuts and bolts perspective.

We’ll start with some tactical Twitter tips for getting an episode seen or heard using unpaid and paid methods.

Unpaid Methods

First and foremost, make sure you’ve got your podcast registered with Stitcher Radio. Stitcher has a nice Twitter integration for sharing episodes.

Next, find your most recent episode:

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You’ll see the Tweet button. Hit it to get the URL for copying and pasting.

Once you’ve gotten it, you can either Tweet as is, rewrite it, or better yet, include it in scheduled Tweets. It’s a good idea to include some hashtags if you’ve got a specific topic or theme. You’ll note I included #SEO. When you tweet with a Stitcher URL, this nice player is what shows up on Twitter. Note that you can hit Play below and hear the episode right inside the tweet – even embedded on my website:

This is a nice way to show off your most recent episode. It’ll get some views and some plays, depending on how large your Twitter following is and how in tune with your show they are.

Next, go to Twitter search and type in: looking for new podcasts. You’ll see a whole bunch of people asking about new shows:

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Look carefully at their requests. For example, in the graphic above, the person asking about podcasts at work might be a good candidate for Marketing Over Coffee, since my show is a work-related show. For the other shows, don’t just blindly reply. Ask if they’re interested in your topic, and if they affirm, only then share your show with them.

If you’re operating on a zero dollar budget, stop here. The above tips will help you grow an organic audience.

Fast Cheap Good

It will not be fast, but it will be cheap, and if you do it with respect, you’ll build a good audience.

Paid Methods

If you don’t have a ton of Twitter followers but you do have some budget, not to worry. Just a few ad dollars can help fix that. Head over to Twitter Analytics at analytics.twitter.com. Click on the Tweets button:

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Scroll down until you find your most recent episode and then click View Tweet Details:

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Now all you need to do is find the Promote Tweet button in the lower left hand corner and hit it:

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And specify how much you want to spend. The tweet will be promoted to your followers and most important, to people who follow topics you mention in your tweet. Remember the hashtag you put in your tweet? This is how the ad software knows who else to show your tweet to.

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For $10, you can get some additional engagement with your show and ideally pick up some new listeners. From here, it’s simply a question of how quickly you want to grow and how much budget you have to expend. It’s fast and it’s good, but of course, compared to unpaid methods, it’s not cheap.

However, your show is more than just passive listeners. What if you want to build up the mailing list so that you can reach out when you need to? In the next post in this series, we’ll look at how to beef up the email list.


Posts in the How to Market Your Podcast series:

Interested in a real-life example? Check out my marketing podcast, Marketing Over Coffee!



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How to market your podcast, part 3: Content strategy

Podcasting is the new darling of the marketing world – a genre that’s been around for over a decade, but only now is getting serious attention. If you’re thinking about starting a podcast, this series is for you, on how to market your new podcast.


Posts in the How to Market Your Podcast series:

Interested in a real-life example? Check out my marketing podcast, Marketing Over Coffee!


In order to achieve your business goals, ultimately your podcast has to have an audience. No audience = no results. So how do you build a podcasting audience? That’s today’s topic.

Building audience is composed of two core components: audience strategy, the who, and content strategy, the what. In the last post, we covered the who. Let’s talk about the what.

The What: Content Strategy

Without good content, no amount of marketing is going to build your audience. Mediocre content will churn listeners as fast as you get them. Bad content won’t even accomplish that. You’ve got to have great content. More important, you’ve got to have several different kinds of content in several different formats to reach your audience reliably.

For example, many podcasts are audio. A few are video. Your audience can’t easily preview either. Thus, you need to have written content to accompany your multimedia. Podcasting old-timers call these “show notes”, but you can call them whatever you like as long as they make sense. Show notes can be literal transcripts of what’s said, or time-based outlines, as we do with the Marketing Over Coffee podcast. As an added bonus, if you’ve got show notes, you can provide additional accessibility to the hearing impaired.

On top of that, there are typically 4 additional media properties beyond the audio/video files themselves. A great podcast probably has an email list so that listeners can receive notifications when new episodes are available. Services like Mailchimp or Feedblitz do this well; simply tie in your podcast RSS feed to the service and it’ll send email every time you publish. If you want to get more sophisticated, you can send out a weekly or monthly recap email as well.

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A great podcast should build social media properties associated with it – Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn are good starting points. Pinterest, Instagram, Snapchat, etc. if your audience is there. If you’re not sure how to check, read the bottom of this post for a neat trick to find your audience. These social properties are another set of avenues for notifying listeners when a new episode is available for them to consume.

Podcasts focused on growing audiences will have advertising channels available to them. This can be something as simple as AdWords text ads or something as complex as media buys and placements in other podcasts. Remember that you don’t have to spend a fortune for paid promotion; things like sponsored Tweets and paid Facebook posts can cost as little as $5 to start.

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Finally, podcasts that want to be found put those show notes onto a website or blog, and that blog is kept up to date and fresh. Search engines cannot reliably index either audio or video yet. I use WordPress for everything, especially since WordPress also automatically creates podcast RSS feeds. Make sure no matter what that your website is mobile friendly.

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That’s your content strategy checklist, the assets you’re going to need: show notes, email list, social network profiles, ad buys, and website.

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Together, they’re like marketing Voltron, a whole bigger than the sum of the parts. (fun fact, Voltron was originally called Beast King GoLion in Japan)

In the next part in this series, we’ll dig into a couple of tactics that bring these strategies to life.


Posts in the How to Market Your Podcast series:

Interested in a real-life example? Check out my marketing podcast, Marketing Over Coffee!



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