The hottest marketing job skills of 2015

LinkedIn recently published their data-mined list of the hottest individual job skills of 2014, based on recruiter interest and LinkedIn profile data. Here’s the raw list:

The_25_Hottest_Skills_That_Got_People_Hired_in_2014___Official_LinkedIn_Blog 2

Do you see a trend? I do. Let’s cluster them together by broad topic areas like marketing, data analysis, and technology skills:

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That’s impressive. Of the top 25 skills, only two are not in the buckets of marketing, data analysis, and technology – and they’re down at positions 15 and 17.

So these are the hot skills of 2014, of the year that was. If you wanted, as Wayne Gretzky would say, to skate where the puck is rather than where it was or where it is now, what would you pick as the top skills of the year ahead?

My recommendation is simple: combinations of these skills. Being proficient in one skill set is likely to get you a good job somewhere. Being proficient at two? That makes you nearly indispensable.

Suppose you had a background in statistical analysis and data mining, AND a background in network security. You could build and identify security problems just as they broke out and started trending, putting you far ahead of the pack.

Suppose you had a background in business intelligence and mobile development. You could engineer the next generation of business intelligence apps, the sort of apps that people would love to use.

Suppose you had a background in Perl/Python/Ruby and SEO/SEM. You could code infrastructures or make ridiculously sticky content because your content would be more interactive and more fun than the standard swill.

This is where the puck is going or could go, and these combinations of skills are what will differentiate the top performing employees from everyone else, make or break the next wave of startups, and redefine your business. Look for them, test for them, and grow them in your companies!

If you’re a marketer looking for the next big thing, the next big thing is you. Pick out a skill on this list that you don’t have and grow it alongside the marketing skills you already have. You’ll be virtually unstoppable.


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The long tail is longer than you think

I left the world of financial aid and student loans way back in January 2010.

Slackershot: Financial Aid Podcast Shirt

I had created a ton of content for the company I was working for at the time, including the very first financial aid podcast, and I’m proud that kids paid less for college based on the work I did.

But this should give you a sense of just how long the long tail of content is. I got this email today – October 23, 2014, almost 5 years after leaving the field:

Quick question could you recommend where my daughter should go/apply for a student loan? I remember you were connected with a student loan site or was I tripping?

This demonstrates the power and longevity of content online. Half a decade has passed since it was my job to answer questions like this, yet people still find me through evergreen content and ask questions. (I’m still happy to answer as best as I can, because it’s for a good cause)

The content you create today can come back to you years later. As long as content marketing programs take to get running, once they have momentum, they can continue paying benefits to you long into the future.

Financial aid stuff

For those interested, by the way, the answer to the above question is as follows. Before you go shopping for loans, be sure you’ve applied for scholarships. There are millions of dollars out there and many scholarships only get a handful of applicants, especially the low dollar ones. Winning 10 $500 scholarships is just as good as winning 1 $5,000 scholarship, and the competition is lighter. Googling for scholarships is simple to do, and just requires dedication and work.

One parent who was a listener of my podcast back in the day had a great tip: he paid his child 10 cents on the dollar for every scholarship they brought home. When Junior wanted a new car, new phone, new etc., this dad reminded him of the deal. By the time freshman year rolled around, the kid had the new phone, new laptop, etc. – because they brought home $138,000 in scholarships.

When it comes to loans, start by completing a FAFSA and then seeing what financial aid you qualify for. Every student enrolled in an eligible, accredited school can get an unsubsidized Stafford federal student loan. Students who file a FAFSA and are given approval by demonstrating financial need can get subsidized Stafford federal student loans as well. After that, students can either apply with a cosigner for private student loans, or parents can apply for federal PLUS loans. For complete information about federal student loans, go visit the US Department of Education’s website.

Your best bet before you begin the financial aid process is to talk to a qualified financial planner to look at all of your options. Many community banks and credit unions offer these services for free to members; typically they work on salary and receive no commissions or incentives to sell you extra stuff. Sometimes, taking out a home equity loan if possible may make greater overall financial sense than taking out a student or parent loan – but you can make that determination only when you look at the big picture, financially.


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Economic outlook for marketers, 4Q 2014

One of the things I like to do from time to time is check in on a variety of different leading economic indicators to get a sense of how the overall economy is doing. That knowledge lets me know – within a certain amount of error – what marketers can expect their quarter to look like. How much should we push our customers? How much should we challenge pricing?

B2C

The consumer is the heart and soul of B2C. If the consumer doesn’t shop, the B2C company doesn’t sell – and the B2C marketer has to work doubly hard just to tread water.

So how is the consumer looking?

Employment:

All_Employees__Total_nonfarm_-_FRED_-_St__Louis_Fed

Nonfarm payrolls are expanding, and fairly significantly. We’ve technically got more people employed now than ever. Of course, some portion of that is natural because as a nation, we have more people than ever.

Unemployment:

Civilian_Unemployment_Rate_-_FRED_-_St__Louis_Fed

U-3, the general measure of unemployment, is below 6%, a place it hasn’t gone since before the Great Recession. If you look in the data, even U-6, the total labor pool across the board, is down to 11.8% underemployment. That’s a far cry from the peak of the Great Recession, when we were pushing 20% underutilization of labor.

Initial Claims of Unemployment:

4-Week_Moving_Average_of_Initial_Claims_-_FRED_-_St__Louis_Fed

We’re back to almost the first dot com bubble, and the height of the boom times before the Great Recession, in terms of the number of people who are filing for job losses. While there are still a whole bunch of people without work, it could be much, much worse.

Real Disposable Income:

Real_Disposable_Personal_Income_-_FRED_-_St__Louis_Fed

2012 was a much better year for income, but we’re approaching it in a much more sustainable way as we head into Q4 of 2014.

Overall, there are a lot of macroeconomic potential shocks out there waiting in the wings. Instability in the Middle East. The Russian-Ukrainian war. Ebola. But the bigger picture, at least for the general US consumer, is that 2014 is ending on fairly solid footing. What does that mean for you as a marketer, if you’re a B2C marketer? You probably don’t have to overhype the low cost message quite as much as you did last year – the consumer overall probably feels a little bit better than 2013, which means slightly looser purse strings for the holiday season.

B2B

For the world of B2B, we look to things that are going to impact companies’ ability to buy from other companies. This means looking at leading indicators from shipping to what it costs to run a business.

PPI:

Producer_Price_Index__All_Commodities_-_FRED_-_St__Louis_Fed

PPI, the Producer Price Index, is the general cost of doing business. What’s unusual here is that business got really expensive during the Great Recession, then prices dropped as the economic shocks rippled up the supply chain, and then for a while things got back on track. But in 2011, PPI plateaued, and it’s been holding there ever since. While you might think it’s a good thing that production costs have leveled off, the reality is that level pricing means that companies of all sizes aren’t making more money on average.

BDI:

BALDRY__1041_00_UNCH__0_

The Baltic Dry Index, BDI, is an index of what it costs to put a bunch of things on a container ship and ship it overseas. This is a great B2B leading indicator because companies don’t buy shipping containers unless they have product to sell. It’s not something you buy just for the heck of it. Again, we see that things went crazy int he run up to the Great Recession, BDI crashed hard at the beginning of 2009, and it really hasn’t made a huge lift since then. We also see the softness in 2011 extending out to today.

VIX:

VIX_Index_Charts_-_CBOE_Volatility_Index_Interactive_Index_Charts_-_MarketWatch

The CBOX VIX, or volatility index, looks at how volatile the markets are. It’s an indicator of how safe or risky investors feel. The VIX hit the roof during the Great Recession and had a few aftershocks in 2011 and 2012, but has calmed down considerably since then. A major portion of that has been the Federal Reserve Bank effectively handing out free money for years to investors via TARP and the Quantitative Easing programs, as well as holding interbank interest rates near 0%.

Do you see the pattern here? In each of the three charts, B2B leading economic indicators show that the B2B economy is in a holding pattern. The sky isn’t falling by any means, but the pie isn’t getting any bigger, either. If you’re in B2B, maybe you’ve noticed this already. Leads are probably becoming sales opportunities at a slower pace. Sales opportunities are probably taking longer and longer to close. If that’s the case, then there’s a good chance you’re caught in this economic plateau as well.

The good news is that a strengthened consumer will eventually ripple upstream to B2B, in general. As you can see from the charts above, the consumer face-planted in 2008, while B2B took as long as two years to fully feel the impact. Thus, as the consumer gets back on their feet, we should expect B2B to do the same. When will that be? Assuming the consumer continues to heal up and get back in the game, probably B2B will feel it in late 2015 or early 2016.

So overall, a merry holiday season for the consumer B2C marketer; B2B won’t get any coal in the stocking, but Scrooge’s ledgers will still be a bit thin.


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