Summer Reruns.png

Once a year, I head to the backwoods of Maine for a week off-grid. No phone, no Internet, nothing except my family, a cabin, and a lake. It’s a wonderful, glorious experience that helps me to recharge, refocus, and recover from the stresses of modern life.

However, as a marketer, a week with no activity doesn’t help my marketing. All other things being equal, activity yields results in digital marketing; no activity means no results. So, my plan for a week off hearkened back to classic television: summer re-runs. While I was away, software would do the sharing for me of previous content.

Methodology

The next question I had to tackle: which content should I re-share?

Instead of just picking content at random, I chose a data-driven approach. I scanned all my blog posts from 2016 for the most shared posts of the year, then re-queued those in Buffer for the week. After all, if I’m going to have a week of re-runs, best to re-share the things people liked most the first time around.

Using the social sharing scanner I built for SHIFT Communications, I identified these 25 posts based on their popularity the first time around:

prevac.png

If you’re not one of my clients, feel free to just use the native analytics built into Facebook, Twitter, etc. instead. Or, become a client of mine at SHIFT and you can have access to the fancy tools 🙂

Results

How did the experiment do? Did my re-runs do better than taking a week off entirely?

postvac.png
  • I began with a total of 2,278 shares across 8 social networks.
  • Over the week, that total rose to 2,637.
  • Overall, I netted 359 additional shares.

What was most interesting was where I picked up new shares.

variance.png

While most articles picked up a handful of new shares, a few broke through the pack and carried the weight for most of the re-sharing, such as:

  • Keeping your marketing skills sharp, 37 new shares
  • The future of social media measurement, 56 new shares
  • How we’ve failed marketing automation, 68 new shares

These top three newly re-shared posts have little in common; this time around, audiences approved of these posts instead.

Other Insights

What else did I learn from this experiment?

gadata.png

Sharing isn’t traffic per se, but it sure helps. I saw a week over week increase of 62% in traffic driven from social networks.

Conversely, because I was posting no net new content, I didn’t please our search overlords. Week over week, I saw a decrease of 3.27% in organic search traffic. I also saw declines in other areas such as referral traffic because I was away, not conducting normal marketing activities.

Conclusion

Should you use the same recipe to populate your social channels when you’re on vacation or otherwise unavailable? I can’t give you an absolute answer, but my results indicate that re-runs are better than nothing. Give them a try using the data-driven methodology of your choice and measure your results. You might be surprised at what gains new life in your content.


If you enjoyed this, please share it with your network!


Want to read more like this from ? Get updates here:

subscribe to my newsletter here


Marketing Blue Belt
Get your copy of Marketing Blue Belt!

Order your 2017 Marketing Planning Framework
Download your 2017 Marketing Planning Framework!


Pin It on Pinterest

Shares
Share This
mautic is open source marketing automation
Subscribe To MyNewsletter

Subscribe To MyNewsletter

Enjoyed the content here? Make sure you never miss anything important. Subscribe to my free weekly newsletter, Almost Timely!

You have Successfully Subscribed!